The DIASPORADIC679 T-shirt

This is one very sexy T-shirt! It features a logo / coat of arms developed by graphic artist, Nicole Lim, based on a painting by Luisa Tora. It was created for the exhibition diasporadic679 – an exhibition that takes the form of posters installed in shop windows in Otahuhu, South Auckland. Check the blog for more information: http://diasporadic679.wordpress.com

The diasporadic679 T-shirt is beautifully printed by South Auckland’s excellent PopoHardWear – the logo is gold, large-scale and fabulous. The T-shirts support the exhibition project costs and are only NZD40.

Please contact Nicole Lim at Fresh Gallery Otara for sales enquiries or drop in between 10am – 5pm, Tuesday – Friday; 8am – 2pm, Saturdays.

#KadavuPower

Fiji women were 100% present at the recent UNICEF Youth Congress held at Te Manukanuka o Hoturoa Marae in Auckland. I spoke in a panel about art as a platform for social activism, after sessions by Sainimere Veitata, Co-chair of the Econesian Society at the University of the South Pacific (Suva, Fiji) and Merewalesi Nailatikau, UNICEF Regional Goodwill Ambassador. Merewalesi was crowned Miss Hibiscus and went on to be the first Fijian woman to take out the Polynesian-dominated Miss South Pacific beauty pageant in 2009. She is brains + beauty in a big way!

My South Auckland comrade, Luisa Tora, came to support. Luisa and I are working on an upcoming project to commemorate Fiji Day in the South Auckland suburb of Otahuhu. In an exhibition of posters featuring artwork by 7 Fiji women artists, diasporadic679 will be installed in the windows and public spaces of 6 venues over 9 days. The numerical reference is to Fiji’s international telephone prefix.

The exhibition will be part of the newly re-branded Southside Arts Festival (previously Manukau Festival of Arts) which runs from 14 October – 6 November 2011.

diasporadic679 takes its name partly from Luisa Tora’s made-in-South-Auckland zine, diasporadic and represents an ongoing relationship between Fiji women artists Sangeeta Singh, Margaret Aull, Torika Bolatagici, Dulcie Stewart, Tagi Qolouvaki, Luisa and myself.

The diasporadic679 blog has just been established and will be updated daily leading up to the project which runs from 17-25 October.

New Work // Union JACKnSLAVE (2011)

Union JACKnSLAVE (2011)
Graphite on paper
350x350mm (framed)

The plastic bag is an analogy for the idea of a treaty.

The function of the plastic bag is not new; but the material was introduced. It is functional, but has limitations. It is flexible but easily manipulated and used to cause harm.

The plastic bag presents a significant environmental hazard and takes 1000 years on average to break down. Alternatives are becoming increasingly popular.

The term ‘jack’ in urban slang can be used to mean ‘to steal or take from an unsuspecting person’. I have long been interested in ideas of nationhood and power. The Union Jack marks the colonial empire – a system built on power, domination and privilege.

This work has been made for an upcoming exhibition to commemorate Waitangi Day called TREATY ISSUES curated by Gabrielle Belz for Nathan Homestead, Manurewa, South Auckland (28 January – 19 February)

FIJI TIMES // New Work by 5 Fiji Women Artists

FIJI TIMES is a group exhibition curated by Ema Tavola for Fiji Independance Day, October 10.

Inspired to make experimental artistic commentary on the current political climate of Fiji, five Fiji women artists have developed new works that tackle political [mis]leadership, faith and religion, censorship and militarism, propaganda, love, land and diaspora.

This exciting short exhibition is a continuation of the VASU: Pacific Women of Power exhibition staged in Suva in 2008. VASU was Fiji’s first platform for the promotion, celebration and discussion of art made by Fiji women.

FIJI TIMES will take place at a central Auckland artist-run-space called The Salon from 10-14 October, opening daily from 12-6pm. Artists will be on site and all are welcome to celebrate the exhibition’s opening from 6pm, Friday 9 October.

Fiji Artists visit for CELEBRATE PASIFIKA

  Daren, Arthur & Tarisi
Visiting Fiji artists Craig Marlow & Lambert Ho, whose work is now on display at O’Kaioceanikart Gallery, Auckland 

Recycled Plastic flowers by Craig Marlow
Recycled plastic bottle flowers made by Craig Marlow at O’Kaioceanikart Gallery, Auckland 


As well as Craig Marlow and Lambert Ho, travelling with the Pacific Arts Alliance this band performed in the Fiji Village at the annual Pasifika Festival in Central Auckland, New Zealand (Saturday 8 March 2008), part of the annual Auckland City Council Celebrate Pasifika festival.

FLAT WHITE BLACK PEARL (1-22 March) Te Karanga Gallery

My work installed in “Flat White Black Pearl” curated by Jim Vivieaere for Tautai Contemporary Pacific Arts Trust

In FLAT WHITE BLACK PEARL, Te Karanga Gallery, Auckland, New Zealand      
Opening Night: Samiu Napa’a & Ema Tavola; install; Nia-val Ngaro & Luisa Lefao-Setoga

Samiu Napa’a with his painting; Curator, Jim Vivieaere
     


At home

Pacific Art takes Another Look at White and Black

Friday, 29 February 2008, 4:48 pm
Press Release: Tautai Contemporary Pacific Arts Trust

A new exhibition of Pacific artists is inviting people to take another look at the contrast of white and black, the personal expression of identity and wider issues of race and ethnicity. ‘Flat White, Black Pearl’ is being shown in Auckland as part of the month-long Celebrate Pasifika festival. Atypical of your usual expectation of Pacific culture in the visual arts, it will only feature works that are in black and white. With almost 50 artists participating in the show, there are bound to be a few surprises about how the artists have chosen to express their ‘colour’ and cultural identity when confined to neutral tones.

“Work has been selected because it is black and/or white, or shades of grey,” explains Jim Vivieaere who has curated the exhibition along with Leeane Clayton, herself an emerging artist and first-time curator.

While the curators concentrate on creating the physical and intellectual experience of the exhibition, the artists determine their own views on issues of race and identity as Pacific artists.

In ‘Flat White, Black Pearl’, although there may be a “colour bar” on the artwork – limited to shades of black, white and grey – there are no limits as to how innovative, expressive, white or black, ordinary or gorgeous the artists choose to be.

The exhibition runs from 1 – 22 March at Te Karanga Gallery on Karangahape Road, Auckland. This exhibition is a Tautai initiative, supported by funding from Creative Communities and part of Auckland City Council’s Celebrate Pasifika 2008.

Jim Vivieaere has had a long and illustrious career as an artist, curator and commentator. Particularly remembered for his exhibition ‘Bottled Ocean’ which was the first survey exhibition of Pacific Island contemporary art.

Leeane Clayton is an emerging Pacific Island artist and first-time curator.

Tautai Contemporary Pacific Arts Trust was established in the 1980s to mentor and support contemporary Pacific art and artists. As a charitable trust it continues to pursue its goals through promoting and providing profile to Pacific heritage artists and their work. It operates on the understanding that the artists remain independent of Tautai and come together through the Tautai connection to participate in art events.

For more information please visit these websites: www.tautai.org  and www.celebratepasifika.com